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Tag Archives: tibiofemoral joint space

New, Reliable Technology for Measuring Tibiofemoral Joint Space

Recent work by Dr. Neil H. Segal examined the potential of a low-dose standing CT scan for evaluating changes in tibiofemoral joint space of patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis.

The results of Dr. Segal’s study were recently published in the medical journal Skeletal Radiology and reveal that when taken two weeks apart, standing CT images are even more reliable than plain radiographs. The insightful, 3-D, information-packed images suggest that the modified foot/ankle scanner by CurveBeam used to capture the data may soon become a valuable tool for doctors to evaluate and track the disease’s progression, as well as for researchers wanting to study it.

Measurements of the tibiofemoral joint space were obtained from two bilateral fixed-flexed standing CT images taken two weeks apart, utilizing a modified version of a CurveBeam scanner more commonly used to capture images of the foot and ankle. Participants were exposed to an extremely low dose of effective radiation, O.2 mSv – no more than the average person is typically exposed to from the natural environment itself in any two-week period.

The main purpose of the study was to determine whether or not standing CT scans might be a viable alternative to plain radiographs for studying patients’ knee osteoarthritis – and how reliable such scans might be. Thirty people with a range of osteoarthritis features took part, and the Institutional Review Board approved all aspects of the study.

The results suggest the data obtained is extremely reliable. Moreover, the 3D imaging of both the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints the standing CT scanner produces offers a wealth of enhanced information for doctors and researchers to draw upon.

All this, the study shows, without a clinically significant increase in either acquisition time or radiation dose.

Dr. Segal’s work comes as a response, in part, to the difficulties and challenges in acquiring meaningful, reliable tibiofemoral joint space measurements using traditional radiographs.

Past studies have shown that the replication of measurements has been poor, with limited information obtained. More aggravating still is the fact that months if not years are usually required between radiographs before any change in the patient’s condition can be detected. An efficient, accurate, time-saving alternative has long been needed.

The modified CurveBeam scanner, by contrast, has the potential to address these challenges. As evidence from the study showed, the standing scanner provided exceptionally reliable images with insignificant doses of radiation emitted.

The next step will be to assess the responsiveness of the standing CT scanner to changes in the tibiofemoral joint over time. If effective, the protocol will no doubt become an invaluable tool for doctors and researchers alike in their work to combat the ravages of knee osteoarthritis and related ailments.

Access the link to the article here.